Clue Comics, a series published by Hillman from January 1943 to May 1947, showcased an unconventional superhero known as The Boy King. Prince David, heir to the throne of Swisslakia, bravely embraced this heroic mantle during the darkest hours of World War II.

Clue Comics #9 November, 1944

Clue Comics #9 November, 1944

In the midst of the Nazi invasion of Swisslakia, Prince David and his family confronted imminent execution by firing squad. Through a stroke of luck, he narrowly escaped death. Before his father’s passing, a chilling revelation emerged: an ancient prophecy by Nostradamus predicted the invasion and hinted at a buried mechanical giant, awaiting activation by a chosen leader from screwing a bolt into it’s head.

With unwavering resolve, the Boy King unearthed and revived the mechanical colossus. He exacted vengeance upon the Nazi perpetrators and briefly thwarted the invaders. Yet, anticipating their inevitable return and fearing reprisals, he embarked on a daring evacuation of his people across the sea to safety in the United States.

There, while the Boy King sought counsel on utilizing the giant for the war effort, he stumbled upon unexpected twists, encountering his long-lost twin brother Muggsy, now a gang leader in Hell’s Kitchen New York, and confronting formidable adversaries.

Clue Comics #9 November, 1944

Clue Comics #9 November, 1944

Clue Comics #9 hit the newsstands in November 1944, just months following the liberation of Paris during World War II. That military battle raged from August 19 to August 25, 1944, and culminated in the surrender of the German garrison and the liberation of the French capital.

Inside the comic, readers are greeted with an adventure titled “That Paris Should Know the Boy King!!” Illustrated by Dan Zolnerowich, this tale pitted the Boy King against Paris, a robot that payed homage to The Mechanical Turk.  The comic cover was by Rudy Palais.

The Mechanical Turk, also called the Automaton Chess Player, was a renowned hoax from the late 18th century. It was purported to be a mechanical chess-playing machine capable of competing against humans. Disguised as a wooden cabinet with intricate machinery, including a life-sized figure resembling a Turkish man, it toured Europe and the Americas, engaging in matches with notable personalities of the era. In reality, the Mechanical Turk was operated by a concealed human chess master who controlled its movements and responded to opponents’ plays.

And with a click-clack and a royal decree, the Boy King declared, ‘Checkmate, Paris! Turns out, the best moves are made with pencil and ink, not just bolts!’

Clue Comics #9 November, 1944

Clue Comics #9 November, 1944