Millie The Model #20

Millie The Model #20

Millie the Model Comic covers have earned a special place among my favorite finds in a crowded field that includes Jeanie, Patsy, Nellie, and more. Remarkably, the series astonishingly ran for almost three decades, spanning from 1945 to 1973 and encompassing the printing of over 200 distinct issues. This impressive feat firmly establishes the series as one of the most enduring and long-running in the history of comic books.  One standout is Millie on issue #20*, dating back to January 1949, adorned with captivating artwork of Millie proudly holding a net full of fish. The identity of the artist behind this masterpiece remains unknown, adding an air of mystery and intrigue to its allure along with the fact the fish jumping into net theme was also covered in Joker #17 (Humorama) and another  “Marvel Magazine” Tessie the Typist Comics #9.

Moving forward, issue #46* catches the eye with its dynamic portrayal of a distracted motorcycle buyer. This particular issue, published in September 1953, marked a significant change as the series dropped from 56 to a thinner 36 pages. The creative duo behind this attention-grabbing cover is none other than the legendary team of  Stan Lee and art by Dan de Carlo, with Lee providing the scripts and de Carlo showcasing his artistic brilliance.

Millie The Model #30

Millie The Model #30

While Stan Lee’s name is synonymous with comic book greatness, Dan de Carlo‘s rise in popularity can be attributed to his contributions to the “good girl art” genre. His previous work on alluring pin-ups for men’s magazines like “Breezy” solidified his credentials in capturing the essence of playful and sexy comedy. Millie (and Jeanie) marked de Carlo’s first artistic publications under Stan Lee, and they would later team up again on My Friend Irma. Their collaboration on books like My Friend Irma is becoming increasingly rare and pricey, making them highly sought after by collectors. However, it was de Carlo’s transition to Archie Comics that truly propelled him to his greatest successes and widespread acclaim.

Eager to immerse myself further in Dan de Carlo’s captivating Millie artwork, I managed to acquire some additional issues. Among them is the classic GGA beauty on the cover of issue #22, featuring Millie draped in nothing but a towel. Additionally, I couldn’t resist adding issues #30* with its television-themed excitement, #43* showcasing Millie’s golfing adventure, and #32* capturing a thrilling car crash moment. Unfortunately, to fuel my relentless comic book pursuits, I had to part ways with a high-grade gem, issue #47*, featuring a stunning beach beauty.

As an avid collector, my quest for comic book treasures continues and evolves. With each addition to my collection, I discover new dimensions of artistic brilliance, fascinating stories, and a deep appreciation for the talented minds behind these Golden Age masterpieces.

* sold copy