Category: SportsPage 3 of 4

The most popular sports in the United States in 1946 were probably baseball, boxing and horse racing. But other sports were certainly present at the time and also represented on comic covers including: tennis, golf, football and numerous outdoor winter activities such as skiing, skating and sledding.

Mitzi’s Boyfriend

From Marvel Comics (yep, the publishers of Captain America and Spiderman) under its Timely indicia published Mitzi’s Boyfriend.  It was a short lived six issue series that ran…

Americas Best Comics

America’s Best Comics #17 from Nedor/Better Publications published March 1946. Featuring Black Terror, Fighting Yank, Doc Strange and Pyroman all scrimmaging in a football game!  Had to have…

Mutt & Jeff

Collecting comics can have a strange way of leading you down various paths – one day you’re collecting good girl art (gga), the next motorcycle covers, then superheroes,…

A Date With Judy

I’ve posted here before that multimedia franchises were not just a modern phenomenon, but part of a strategy as old as Madison Avenue itself. There was a time when…

United Comics

                  What fun it was to discover a modern day artist’s homage to Fritz Ritz.  Of course, that is not…

Tip Topper Comics

The fact that out of the first ten issues of Tip Topper Comics no less than seven feature Fritzi Ritz in a bathing suit suggest I might not have…

Tessie the Typist

Pictured here are my copies of Tessie the Typist published by Timely, #3 from 1944, #13 (December 1947) and #15 (April 1948). Timely had begun growing a niche…

Looney Tunes & Merrie Melodies

“What’s up, Doc?”  Pictured above is my Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies Comics #24, published October 1943. Cover art is by Walt Kelly, curiously signed by studio head Leon Schlesinger. Pictured…

Plastic Man

Plastic Man or “Plas” was a Golden Age classic. Shown on left is my Plastic Man #16  from March 1949.   I appreciate it for it’s “Mo’ Money, Mo’…

Ozark Ike

Once exceptionally popular, Li’l Abner is nearly forgotten today. And if we can no longer recall Al Capp’s Li’l Abner and Daisy Mae, there probably is not much…